Interview with Michael Horton


Hello Everyone!

We are delighted to have author Michael Horton amongst us today at Musikdiv India Online Magazine at our Special ‘Authors Festival’ interview series to tell us about his new book Eyr Apparent!
Please read on …


A deadly secret casts doubt on Eyr’s friendship with the empress. What is the true nature of the world and its scaly, colorful inhabitants? How long can the empress hide her intentions before the nations enter a needless war? And what secret could be worth risking a second apocalypse?
A country where social status is measured in blood. A village where the all-seeing oracle is never wrong. A creation myth that dictates the very fate of all that exists, from the mighty Gaunt elder to the smallest chameleon. Eyr and Caviar will need to understand these mysteries and more if they hope to prevent a cataclysmic war that will surely end their ever-changing world.
—————————————————————————————————————————————————————————

So Michael, we’ll start your Interview with the very first question

1.Please introduce and tell the readers something about yourself.

My name is Michael Horton. I’m an art geek, music lover, and fiction author.

2.How long have you been writing?

For about as long as I can remember. I started writing a lot more in middle school and high school, though. I guess it’s been close to 15 years now.

3.Which was your first literary project? Tell us something about it.

I think my first major undertaking was a series of books about teenagers with colorful hair and psychic powers. There was a legendary sword in there, too. I think every fantasy author has a story just like it archived away somewhere.

4.Is this your new/latest project?

No, that one’s been abandoned for years now. My newest project is my second or third real attempt at science fiction, so I hope it comes together eventually.

5. Traditional books or e-books? How do you prefer to see your works published? Have you tried ever publishing the traditional way?

A couple years ago I wasn’t really sold on ebooks, but they’ve grown on me a lot since then. Given the rate at which e-readership is growing, I don’t mind having my work available in that format. Paperback sales are declining, but they’re not dead yet, and likely won’t be for a long while. So I’m keeping a close eye on traditional publishing, but I’m more optimistic about the future of ebooks.

7.Can you give a chapter sample preview of your book here for our readers to know more about it.

Of course! This is the first chapter from Eyr Apparent, the sequel to Into Thin Eyr, my first self-published book. I wrote them several months apart, but I think I’ve learned a lot in between those two releases. It’s a sort of dystopian adventure set in a fantasy world.
( Please look at the bottom of the interview for book excerpts )

8.What are your hobbies? Things that you enjoy doing besides books of course.

Cooking! I love cooking. It’s like writing you can eat. Mouth poetry.

9.Who is your favourite author?

I think I have too many. If we’re going with authors who have influenced me the most, I’d have to go with Lovecraft and Hemingway. Their styles are basically polar opposites though, I suppose.

10.What is your favourite genre to read and also to write?

When I was growing up it was fantasy and horror with a bit of sci-fi—speculative fiction in a nutshell. These days I’m partial to urban fantasy, ghosts and magic in the modern world—anything that doesn’t take itself too seriously. I’ll read just about anything, but that’s what a grab first.

11.Do you have a role model that you get inspiration from?

I’m honestly inspired by other indie authors as much as anyone else. The ones who have been carving their own path since before Hocking and Locke blew things wide open. It’s hard enough to finish a book, and that’s not close to the end of the process. Good job you guys.

12.Where do get your ideas from? Do you take your story ideas from real life situations?

Ideas come from everywhere. Everything. Mythology, religion, the evening news. We’re constantly inundated with amazing stories and ideas. You flip a familiar idea around and there’s something new on the other side. It’s overwhelming when you think about it.

13. Do you have a pseudonym?

Almost, but in the end I decided against it. Other writers share my name, but I have to be who I am anyway, I think.

14.What’s your experience been like in the publishing industry?

Positive or negative? Please share your experience with our readers.
It’s been a rollercoaster, just learning the ins and outs of the business. I came in at a time when Kindles were picking up steam and suddenly everybody was a publisher or an author. I’ve stuck with small publishing houses and doing things myself so far, and on that front I can’t complain. I’ve had good experiences with some great people—editors, artists, people who really want to help you succeed. I’m happy.

15.Where do you see yourself 10years from now?

I don’t know what books are going to look like in 10 years, but I’ll still be writing them.

16. What motivates you to write?

I love writing for its own sake, but when someone tells me, “Hey, I read that book and really enjoyed it,” how can I stop?

17. How important is good cover art for your books?

The cover is the first thing people see, on their reading device or in a bookstore. People judge books by them, so having one that makes people stop and look is important. A good cover is subjective, but you know when a cover is bad. If I can avoid bad, I’m satisfied.

18. Do you have a price strategy for your books?

Just about all of my self-published books at the moment are short stories, or novella-length works. I know some readers are leery of $0.99 works, but I can’t bring myself to sell my shorter fiction for more than that. It’s not to devalue the work at all; I price based on length first and foremost. I’ve gotten a lot of enjoyment out of bite-sized reads, personally, and I hope my readers feel the same way.

19. How does it make you feel when you read a bestselling book that you don’t feel is as good as yours?

Writing is like any creative business, and it’s easy to get discouraged when you see others doing better than you while you struggle. If someone somewhere enjoys that book, or your book, then it has value. Period. It’s not all about numbers and awards. Plus I hate my writing most days.

20.Why do you think readers should buy your book? What can you offer them through your book?

Whenever I write a new book I try a new approach. I look at things differently and try to tell a different kind of story, or tell it in a new way. I think it’s pretty common, on the best sellers list especially, for authors to write the same book again and again with a different coat of paint (or cover, in this case). I think people who read my work will be able to see that I’m passionate about providing a fun experience with every new release.

21.Where is your book available? Any Buy Link for our readers?

My books are available for purchase Amazon, B&N, and Smashwords.
http://www.amazon.com/dp/B0070IAUD2 (My author profile page)
http://www.smashwords.com/profile/view/horton (Another author page)

22.Do you have a website or a blog that you’d like to share here.

I have a blog: http://mhortonbooks.blogspot.com
And a site for my upcoming novel: http://www.devilhavemercy.com

23. What advice would you give to other writers?

Keep writing, even when you think you’ve run out of ideas.

24.Anything else you’d like to share with our readers?

Thanks so much for reading! I hope you’ll keep an eye out of “Devil Have Mercy” this March.

  • Thank you Michael Horton for gracing us with your presence.It was a sheer pleasure.Good luck with your book.We conclude the interview hereThanks again from Team MusikDIV

    Book Exerpts – Sample Chapter

    Eyr Apparent By Michael Horton

    The guard tapped the butt of his rifle twice against the gate, and the doors swept open to reveal a bright, frost-coated courtyard. Eyr’s eyes found the giant blades spinning against the sky as she entered the castle walls. For the first time she began to wonder if the swirling blades ever came down for maintenance. Hundreds of them had kept the islands aloft for nearly three years, but how much longer could they last?
    Gears positioned within the walls clicked and churned against one another. Wind provided electricity kept the gears turning. The gears provided torque and helped the propeller blades capture wind. The cycle had come to symbolize Delonia itself even more than its leader.
    Nyx came panting into the courtyard shortly after Eyr arrived, pushing long pins into her hair to secure a tight curl. She pulled her cloak around her shivering body, elegant garments unable to betray her tomboyish nature. “It’s good to see you again.”
    “I saw you a week ago,” Eyr replied.
    “But you live so close to the castle. I expect to see you more often.”
    “About that… I’ve come to ask you for a wing bike.”
    “A wing…?” Nyx shook her head. “I don’t understand. Are you going somewhere?”
    “I’d like to. Somewhere. Anywhere.”
    “I appreciate your candidness, but what if something happens? What if war comes and you aren’t here to offer your leadership?”
    “The chameleons don’t need my leadership, and I’m hardly worthy of being called their leader to begin with. Nothing but good has come since you took the throne from Theus. I’m ready to move on with my own life.”
    Nyx swallowed. Eyr thought she’d said something wrong, but a glance over her own shoulder confirmed something else entirely. A tall, dark figure stood behind the castle gate. Its dimensions weren’t quite human—narrow hips with long, wiry legs. Spindly arms terminated by four claw-like fingers. The creature’s shoulders were broad, wider than its exposed waist by several times, and its nose was more of a beakish protrusion extending from its forehead over a lipless mouth. Its garb was a deep, royal hue that meshed with its long hair.
    Thump. Thump.
    Two more birdmen, both taller, appeared behind the first as if they’d dropped out of the sky. The rising sun set their blue armor aglow. The smaller birdman focused his wide, unblinking eyes on the castle before him, scanning the courtyard and settling on the empress. The castle guard was frozen in his tracks, seemingly terrified of their visitors.
    “You again…” Nyx wrapped herself up tighter as she addressed the stranger, practically shrinking out of sight. “What do you want now?”
    Eyr gave her a look. “You know them?”
    “We have come with the same request as before, Empress of Delonia,” the first birdman said. Without lips he appeared to have a permanent scowl, and his voice was a lingering hiss after he spoke. “But this is the last time the Gaunt shall ask. If I am sent here again, there shall be… consequences.”
    The three men stepped forward. The smallest scratched the side of his nose with a claw. “Why do you resist when compliance would be so much simpler, Empress?”
    Nyx appeared to be caught between fight and flight. She gripped the crystal pendant at her neck. “What you want is impossible. I refuse.”
    “Consequences for what? What does he want you to do?” Eyr looked between them, but neither seemed to acknowledge her presence.
    Finally the middle birdman raised the spot where eyebrows would have been on a human and dipped at his waist in a shallow bow. “I am Yfee of the Gaunt, sent by Lord Inui. We dwell in the sky above your sky,” he said. “If your islands continue to rise as they have been, you will soon enter the Agaro. That is sacred sky to my people, and you humans have ignored our plight for far too long.”
    Eyr didn’t realize Delonia had been rising that quickly, but it made sense the more she thought about it. She turned her attention to Nyx. “Why don’t you do what he asks?”
    “We don’t know what might happen if we try to lower the islands,” Nyx said. Her voice was tinged with hostility. “Worst case scenario, we end up in the river all over again. I’ve worked too hard for that. Delonia’s ascent shall continue.”
    Whatever consequences this dangerous-looking man had spoken of would probably be much worse, Eyr thought, but she knew better than to speak out against her empress in front of a foreign dignitary, even if they were friends.
    She had an idea.
    “Send me to speak with their leader,” Eyr said.
    Nyx narrowed her eyes. “I don’t want you getting involved.”
    “I just think we should hear what they have to say. With any luck, we might be able to reach a solution together.”
    And it’s finally a chance for me to get off this rock.
    “It has a good idea, this one.” The muscles on Yfee’s face twitched into a grotesque smile. “What is it the tiny one called?”
    “Eyr. Sir.” She wavered, uncertain as to how formal she should be.
    “Eyr the small human.” He gave another bow, and Eyr bowed back despite feeling somewhat offended. “If the empress allows it, I will consult Lord Inui about hearing this one speak.”
    The blue-armored Gaunt stood motionless, statuesque. Eyr felt like she was looking at a strange portrait from another world. Nyx followed suit, completely silent with a finger between her lips.
    “I really didn’t want you to know about this,” she whispered.
    “I would have found my way there eventually,” Eyr whispered back. “Just say yes.”
    Nyx sighed and relaxed her shoulders. The edge of her mantle darkened with moisture as it settled along the ground. “Very well. But I’m offering her as an emissary, not collateral. You must return her in one piece once negotiations are complete.”
    “As the Empress of Delonia wishes.” Yfee spread his claws and clasped them together. “I will return here once I have alerted my lord.” He jerked his head back, and the sound of tearing flesh pierced the air. A pair of large black wings spread from his back and carried him skyward in an instant. The two armored guards vanished only a second later, similar wings lifting them out of sight.
    I wish I could fly, Eyr thought once her pulse returned to normal. Then I wouldn’t have to get permission to go anywhere.
    “Is that why you came here today?” Nyx frowned at her. “You just wanted to leave, no matter what?”
    Eyr shrugged, still watching the cloud-filled sky.
    “Have I not been a good friend to you? Have I not provided you with everything you’ve ever asked for?”
    She shrugged again. “You’ve done so much, and I really am grateful. I just can’t stay in one place forever. I still have too many old memories and not enough new ones.” Every meal she cooked reminded her that she’d never be as good in the kitchen as her mother. She’d never be as charismatic as her father. She’d never be as smart as her brother, or as tall, or as good with machines. She had only one reason to stay in Delonia, and that reason had been hiding secrets from her. “How long have they been threatening you?”
    Nyx half-smiled. “The Gaunt? Since we started ascending. Maybe the second month after we took to the skies.”
    “Why didn’t you tell me?”
    “I did, sort of. I told you to make sure we’d be ready for war.”
    “So you were planning to just sit here and watch all it happen?”
    “Please don’t raise your voice at me.” The empress tried to rub the heat from her reddening cheeks. “Diplomacy isn’t something I do anyway.”
    Eyr recalled how Nyx’s course of action against Emperor Theus was to fly into the castle from above and stab him to death. He’d been a clockwork, of course, so that didn’t exactly work out.
    “Anything else you need to tell me before Delonia’s attacked by those creatures?”
    Nyx shook her head. “Pol, I’m going fetch our guest a wing bike. Can you keep her company until I return?”
    The guard saluted her. “Of course, my empress.”


    Buy Eyr Apparent by Michael Horton On Amazon Kindle >> http://www.amazon.com/dp/B0070IAUD2


    MusikDIV India Online Magazine is an online platform dedicated to promoting talented musicians and writers and giving them the ultimate platform to showcase their talent through our website http://www.musicdiv.co.cc
    If you want to be featured in our MusikDIV India exclusive Interviews kindly email us at : musicnd@yahoo.com

Advertisements

Leave Your Comments

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: